diff mbox series

[v2] usertools/dpdk-devbind: add support for PCI wildcards

Message ID 20200820154308.3212-1-bruce.richardson@intel.com (mailing list archive)
State Superseded, archived
Headers show
Series [v2] usertools/dpdk-devbind: add support for PCI wildcards | expand

Checks

Context Check Description
ci/travis-robot success Travis build: passed
ci/Intel-compilation success Compilation OK
ci/checkpatch warning coding style issues

Commit Message

Bruce Richardson Aug. 20, 2020, 3:43 p.m. UTC
When binding or unbinding a range of devices, it can be useful to use
wildcards to specify the devices rather than repeating the same prefix
multiple times. We can use the python "glob" module to give us this
functionality - at least for PCI devices - by checking /sys for matching
files.

Examples of use from my system:

    ./dpdk-devbind.py -b vfio-pci 80:04.*
    ./dpdk-devbind.py -u 80:04.[2-7]

The first example binds eight devices, 80:04.0..80:04.7, to vfio-pci. The
second then unbinds six of those devices, 80:04.2..80:04.7, from any
driver.

Signed-off-by: Bruce Richardson <bruce.richardson@intel.com>
Tested-by: Ferruh Yigit <ferruh.yigit@intel.com>
---
V2: added help text additions
---
 usertools/dpdk-devbind.py | 16 ++++++++++++++++
 1 file changed, 16 insertions(+)

Comments

Burakov, Anatoly Aug. 21, 2020, 9:14 a.m. UTC | #1
On 20-Aug-20 4:43 PM, Bruce Richardson wrote:
> When binding or unbinding a range of devices, it can be useful to use
> wildcards to specify the devices rather than repeating the same prefix
> multiple times. We can use the python "glob" module to give us this
> functionality - at least for PCI devices - by checking /sys for matching
> files.
> 
> Examples of use from my system:
> 
>      ./dpdk-devbind.py -b vfio-pci 80:04.*
>      ./dpdk-devbind.py -u 80:04.[2-7]
> 
> The first example binds eight devices, 80:04.0..80:04.7, to vfio-pci. The
> second then unbinds six of those devices, 80:04.2..80:04.7, from any
> driver.
> 
> Signed-off-by: Bruce Richardson <bruce.richardson@intel.com>
> Tested-by: Ferruh Yigit <ferruh.yigit@intel.com>
> ---
> V2: added help text additions
> ---
>   usertools/dpdk-devbind.py | 16 ++++++++++++++++
>   1 file changed, 16 insertions(+)
> 
> diff --git a/usertools/dpdk-devbind.py b/usertools/dpdk-devbind.py
> index 86b6b53c40..d13defbe1a 100755
> --- a/usertools/dpdk-devbind.py
> +++ b/usertools/dpdk-devbind.py
> @@ -8,6 +8,7 @@
>   import os
>   import getopt
>   import subprocess
> +from glob import glob
>   from os.path import exists, abspath, dirname, basename
>   
>   if sys.version_info.major < 3:
> @@ -89,6 +90,8 @@ def usage():
>   where DEVICE1, DEVICE2 etc, are specified via PCI "domain:bus:slot.func" syntax
>   or "bus:slot.func" syntax. For devices bound to Linux kernel drivers, they may
>   also be referred to by Linux interface name e.g. eth0, eth1, em0, em1, etc.
> +If devices are specified using PCI <domain:>bus:device:func format, then
> +shell wildcards and ranges may be used, e.g. 80:04.*, 80:04.[0-3]
>   
>   Options:
>       --help, --usage:
> @@ -145,6 +148,9 @@ def usage():
>   To bind 0000:02:00.0 and 0000:02:00.1 to the ixgbe kernel driver
>           %(argv0)s -b ixgbe 02:00.0 02:00.1
>   
> +To bind all funcions on device 0000:02:00 to ixgbe kernel driver
> +        %(argv0)s -b ixgbe 02:00.*
> +
>       """ % locals())  # replace items from local variables
>   
>   
> @@ -689,6 +695,16 @@ def parse_args():
>               else:
>                   b_flag = arg
>   
> +    # resolve any PCI globs in the args
> +    new_args = []
> +    sysfs_path = "/sys/bus/pci/devices/"
> +    for arg in args:
> +        globbed_arg = glob(sysfs_path + arg) + glob(sysfs_path + "0000:" + arg)

os.path.join()?

> +        if globbed_arg:
> +            new_args.extend([a[len(sysfs_path):] for a in globbed_arg])

os.path.basename()?

> +        else:
> +            new_args.append(arg)
> +    args = new_args
>   
>   def do_arg_actions():
>       '''do the actual action requested by the user'''
>
Burakov, Anatoly Aug. 21, 2020, 9:17 a.m. UTC | #2
On 20-Aug-20 4:43 PM, Bruce Richardson wrote:
> When binding or unbinding a range of devices, it can be useful to use
> wildcards to specify the devices rather than repeating the same prefix
> multiple times. We can use the python "glob" module to give us this
> functionality - at least for PCI devices - by checking /sys for matching
> files.
> 
> Examples of use from my system:
> 
>      ./dpdk-devbind.py -b vfio-pci 80:04.*
>      ./dpdk-devbind.py -u 80:04.[2-7]
> 
> The first example binds eight devices, 80:04.0..80:04.7, to vfio-pci. The
> second then unbinds six of those devices, 80:04.2..80:04.7, from any
> driver.
> 
> Signed-off-by: Bruce Richardson <bruce.richardson@intel.com>
> Tested-by: Ferruh Yigit <ferruh.yigit@intel.com>
> ---
> V2: added help text additions
> ---
>   usertools/dpdk-devbind.py | 16 ++++++++++++++++
>   1 file changed, 16 insertions(+)
> 
> diff --git a/usertools/dpdk-devbind.py b/usertools/dpdk-devbind.py
> index 86b6b53c40..d13defbe1a 100755
> --- a/usertools/dpdk-devbind.py
> +++ b/usertools/dpdk-devbind.py
> @@ -8,6 +8,7 @@
>   import os
>   import getopt
>   import subprocess
> +from glob import glob
>   from os.path import exists, abspath, dirname, basename
>   
>   if sys.version_info.major < 3:
> @@ -89,6 +90,8 @@ def usage():
>   where DEVICE1, DEVICE2 etc, are specified via PCI "domain:bus:slot.func" syntax
>   or "bus:slot.func" syntax. For devices bound to Linux kernel drivers, they may
>   also be referred to by Linux interface name e.g. eth0, eth1, em0, em1, etc.
> +If devices are specified using PCI <domain:>bus:device:func format, then
> +shell wildcards and ranges may be used, e.g. 80:04.*, 80:04.[0-3]
>   
>   Options:
>       --help, --usage:
> @@ -145,6 +148,9 @@ def usage():
>   To bind 0000:02:00.0 and 0000:02:00.1 to the ixgbe kernel driver
>           %(argv0)s -b ixgbe 02:00.0 02:00.1
>   
> +To bind all funcions on device 0000:02:00 to ixgbe kernel driver
> +        %(argv0)s -b ixgbe 02:00.*
> +
>       """ % locals())  # replace items from local variables
>   
>   
> @@ -689,6 +695,16 @@ def parse_args():
>               else:
>                   b_flag = arg
>   
> +    # resolve any PCI globs in the args
> +    new_args = []
> +    sysfs_path = "/sys/bus/pci/devices/"
> +    for arg in args:
> +        globbed_arg = glob(sysfs_path + arg) + glob(sysfs_path + "0000:" + arg)

Also, could be

glob_path = arg if arg.startswith("0000:") else "0000:" + arg
globbed_arg = glob(os.path.join(sysfs_path, glob_path))

No need to glob twice :)

> +        if globbed_arg:
> +            new_args.extend([a[len(sysfs_path):] for a in globbed_arg])
> +        else:
> +            new_args.append(arg)
> +    args = new_args
>   
>   def do_arg_actions():
>       '''do the actual action requested by the user'''
>
Bruce Richardson Aug. 24, 2020, 4:19 p.m. UTC | #3
On Fri, Aug 21, 2020 at 10:17:14AM +0100, Burakov, Anatoly wrote:
> On 20-Aug-20 4:43 PM, Bruce Richardson wrote:
> > When binding or unbinding a range of devices, it can be useful to use
> > wildcards to specify the devices rather than repeating the same prefix
> > multiple times. We can use the python "glob" module to give us this
> > functionality - at least for PCI devices - by checking /sys for matching
> > files.
> > 
> > Examples of use from my system:
> > 
> >      ./dpdk-devbind.py -b vfio-pci 80:04.*
> >      ./dpdk-devbind.py -u 80:04.[2-7]
> > 
> > The first example binds eight devices, 80:04.0..80:04.7, to vfio-pci. The
> > second then unbinds six of those devices, 80:04.2..80:04.7, from any
> > driver.
> > 
> > Signed-off-by: Bruce Richardson <bruce.richardson@intel.com>
> > Tested-by: Ferruh Yigit <ferruh.yigit@intel.com>
> > ---
> > V2: added help text additions
> > ---
> >   usertools/dpdk-devbind.py | 16 ++++++++++++++++
> >   1 file changed, 16 insertions(+)
> > 
> > diff --git a/usertools/dpdk-devbind.py b/usertools/dpdk-devbind.py
> > index 86b6b53c40..d13defbe1a 100755
> > --- a/usertools/dpdk-devbind.py
> > +++ b/usertools/dpdk-devbind.py
> > @@ -8,6 +8,7 @@
> >   import os
> >   import getopt
> >   import subprocess
> > +from glob import glob
> >   from os.path import exists, abspath, dirname, basename
> >   if sys.version_info.major < 3:
> > @@ -89,6 +90,8 @@ def usage():
> >   where DEVICE1, DEVICE2 etc, are specified via PCI "domain:bus:slot.func" syntax
> >   or "bus:slot.func" syntax. For devices bound to Linux kernel drivers, they may
> >   also be referred to by Linux interface name e.g. eth0, eth1, em0, em1, etc.
> > +If devices are specified using PCI <domain:>bus:device:func format, then
> > +shell wildcards and ranges may be used, e.g. 80:04.*, 80:04.[0-3]
> >   Options:
> >       --help, --usage:
> > @@ -145,6 +148,9 @@ def usage():
> >   To bind 0000:02:00.0 and 0000:02:00.1 to the ixgbe kernel driver
> >           %(argv0)s -b ixgbe 02:00.0 02:00.1
> > +To bind all funcions on device 0000:02:00 to ixgbe kernel driver
> > +        %(argv0)s -b ixgbe 02:00.*
> > +
> >       """ % locals())  # replace items from local variables
> > @@ -689,6 +695,16 @@ def parse_args():
> >               else:
> >                   b_flag = arg
> > +    # resolve any PCI globs in the args
> > +    new_args = []
> > +    sysfs_path = "/sys/bus/pci/devices/"
> > +    for arg in args:
> > +        globbed_arg = glob(sysfs_path + arg) + glob(sysfs_path + "0000:" + arg)
> 
> Also, could be
> 
> glob_path = arg if arg.startswith("0000:") else "0000:" + arg
> globbed_arg = glob(os.path.join(sysfs_path, glob_path))
> 
> No need to glob twice :)
> 

Well, the two are not quite equivalent if one assumes that the domain part
can start with something other than 0000. If the domain is e.g. FFFF:, you
don't want to prefix that with 0000 - only if no domain is specified.
Therefore it's safer to glob twice, especially since we are not
particularly concerned about performance here (or else we wouldn't be using
python!).

/Bruce
Bruce Richardson Aug. 24, 2020, 5:05 p.m. UTC | #4
On Fri, Aug 21, 2020 at 10:14:19AM +0100, Burakov, Anatoly wrote:
> On 20-Aug-20 4:43 PM, Bruce Richardson wrote:
> > When binding or unbinding a range of devices, it can be useful to use
> > wildcards to specify the devices rather than repeating the same prefix
> > multiple times. We can use the python "glob" module to give us this
> > functionality - at least for PCI devices - by checking /sys for matching
> > files.
> > 
> > Examples of use from my system:
> > 
> >      ./dpdk-devbind.py -b vfio-pci 80:04.*
> >      ./dpdk-devbind.py -u 80:04.[2-7]
> > 
> > The first example binds eight devices, 80:04.0..80:04.7, to vfio-pci. The
> > second then unbinds six of those devices, 80:04.2..80:04.7, from any
> > driver.
> > 
> > Signed-off-by: Bruce Richardson <bruce.richardson@intel.com>
> > Tested-by: Ferruh Yigit <ferruh.yigit@intel.com>
> > ---
> > V2: added help text additions
> > ---
> >   usertools/dpdk-devbind.py | 16 ++++++++++++++++
> >   1 file changed, 16 insertions(+)
> > 
> > diff --git a/usertools/dpdk-devbind.py b/usertools/dpdk-devbind.py
> > index 86b6b53c40..d13defbe1a 100755
> > --- a/usertools/dpdk-devbind.py
> > +++ b/usertools/dpdk-devbind.py
> > @@ -8,6 +8,7 @@
> >   import os
> >   import getopt
> >   import subprocess
> > +from glob import glob
> >   from os.path import exists, abspath, dirname, basename
> >   if sys.version_info.major < 3:
> > @@ -89,6 +90,8 @@ def usage():
> >   where DEVICE1, DEVICE2 etc, are specified via PCI "domain:bus:slot.func" syntax
> >   or "bus:slot.func" syntax. For devices bound to Linux kernel drivers, they may
> >   also be referred to by Linux interface name e.g. eth0, eth1, em0, em1, etc.
> > +If devices are specified using PCI <domain:>bus:device:func format, then
> > +shell wildcards and ranges may be used, e.g. 80:04.*, 80:04.[0-3]
> >   Options:
> >       --help, --usage:
> > @@ -145,6 +148,9 @@ def usage():
> >   To bind 0000:02:00.0 and 0000:02:00.1 to the ixgbe kernel driver
> >           %(argv0)s -b ixgbe 02:00.0 02:00.1
> > +To bind all funcions on device 0000:02:00 to ixgbe kernel driver
> > +        %(argv0)s -b ixgbe 02:00.*
> > +
> >       """ % locals())  # replace items from local variables
> > @@ -689,6 +695,16 @@ def parse_args():
> >               else:
> >                   b_flag = arg
> > +    # resolve any PCI globs in the args
> > +    new_args = []
> > +    sysfs_path = "/sys/bus/pci/devices/"
> > +    for arg in args:
> > +        globbed_arg = glob(sysfs_path + arg) + glob(sysfs_path + "0000:" + arg)
> 
> os.path.join()?
> 
> > +        if globbed_arg:
> > +            new_args.extend([a[len(sysfs_path):] for a in globbed_arg])
> 
> os.path.basename()?
> 
These are used in V4.
diff mbox series

Patch

diff --git a/usertools/dpdk-devbind.py b/usertools/dpdk-devbind.py
index 86b6b53c40..d13defbe1a 100755
--- a/usertools/dpdk-devbind.py
+++ b/usertools/dpdk-devbind.py
@@ -8,6 +8,7 @@ 
 import os
 import getopt
 import subprocess
+from glob import glob
 from os.path import exists, abspath, dirname, basename
 
 if sys.version_info.major < 3:
@@ -89,6 +90,8 @@  def usage():
 where DEVICE1, DEVICE2 etc, are specified via PCI "domain:bus:slot.func" syntax
 or "bus:slot.func" syntax. For devices bound to Linux kernel drivers, they may
 also be referred to by Linux interface name e.g. eth0, eth1, em0, em1, etc.
+If devices are specified using PCI <domain:>bus:device:func format, then
+shell wildcards and ranges may be used, e.g. 80:04.*, 80:04.[0-3]
 
 Options:
     --help, --usage:
@@ -145,6 +148,9 @@  def usage():
 To bind 0000:02:00.0 and 0000:02:00.1 to the ixgbe kernel driver
         %(argv0)s -b ixgbe 02:00.0 02:00.1
 
+To bind all funcions on device 0000:02:00 to ixgbe kernel driver
+        %(argv0)s -b ixgbe 02:00.*
+
     """ % locals())  # replace items from local variables
 
 
@@ -689,6 +695,16 @@  def parse_args():
             else:
                 b_flag = arg
 
+    # resolve any PCI globs in the args
+    new_args = []
+    sysfs_path = "/sys/bus/pci/devices/"
+    for arg in args:
+        globbed_arg = glob(sysfs_path + arg) + glob(sysfs_path + "0000:" + arg)
+        if globbed_arg:
+            new_args.extend([a[len(sysfs_path):] for a in globbed_arg])
+        else:
+            new_args.append(arg)
+    args = new_args
 
 def do_arg_actions():
     '''do the actual action requested by the user'''