diff mbox

[dpdk-dev,2/3] docs: adjust line lengths in FreeBSD GSG rst files

Message ID 1416844136-4604-1-git-send-email-bruce.richardson@intel.com (mailing list archive)
State Accepted, archived
Headers show

Commit Message

Bruce Richardson Nov. 24, 2014, 3:48 p.m. UTC
The FreeBSD GSG rst files had very inconsistent line lengths for text
within paragraph blocks. Sometimes a line would be very short, while often
lines would be quite long.
This patch adjusts the formatting of the rst files so that lines break
at approx the 80-character mark, as is standard in the DPDK source code.

Signed-off-by: Bruce Richardson <bruce.richardson@intel.com>
---
 doc/guides/freebsd_gsg/build_dpdk.rst        | 110 +++++++++++++++------------
 doc/guides/freebsd_gsg/build_sample_apps.rst |  80 ++++++++++---------
 doc/guides/freebsd_gsg/intro.rst             |  44 ++++++-----
 doc/guides/freebsd_gsg/sys_reqs.rst          |  47 ++++++------
 4 files changed, 157 insertions(+), 124 deletions(-)

Comments

Iremonger, Bernard Nov. 26, 2014, 10:42 a.m. UTC | #1
> -----Original Message-----

> Subject: [dpdk-dev] [PATCH 2/3] docs: adjust line lengths in FreeBSD GSG rst files

> 

> The FreeBSD GSG rst files had very inconsistent line lengths for text within paragraph blocks.

> Sometimes a line would be very short, while often lines would be quite long.

> This patch adjusts the formatting of the rst files so that lines break at approx the 80-character mark, as

> is standard in the DPDK source code.

> 

> Signed-off-by: Bruce Richardson <bruce.richardson@intel.com>


Acked-by: Bernard Iremonger <bernard.iremonger@intel.com>


 I have applied the patch to my tree next/dpdk-doc.
Thomas Monjalon Dec. 3, 2014, 1:23 p.m. UTC | #2
2014-11-24 15:48, Bruce Richardson:
> The FreeBSD GSG rst files had very inconsistent line lengths for text
> within paragraph blocks. Sometimes a line would be very short, while often
> lines would be quite long.
> This patch adjusts the formatting of the rst files so that lines break
> at approx the 80-character mark, as is standard in the DPDK source code.

I'm not sure we should be strict with line lengths in the doc.
The most important thing is to limit the wrapping impact of future patches.
Starting a new sentence at the beginning of the line is often a good way
to keep context lines unchanged when updating only one sentence.
Don't forget that a carriage return in rst has no impact on generated doc.
Bruce Richardson Dec. 3, 2014, 2:54 p.m. UTC | #3
On Wed, Dec 03, 2014 at 02:23:44PM +0100, Thomas Monjalon wrote:
> 2014-11-24 15:48, Bruce Richardson:
> > The FreeBSD GSG rst files had very inconsistent line lengths for text
> > within paragraph blocks. Sometimes a line would be very short, while often
> > lines would be quite long.
> > This patch adjusts the formatting of the rst files so that lines break
> > at approx the 80-character mark, as is standard in the DPDK source code.
> 
> I'm not sure we should be strict with line lengths in the doc.
> The most important thing is to limit the wrapping impact of future patches.
> Starting a new sentence at the beginning of the line is often a good way
> to keep context lines unchanged when updating only one sentence.
> Don't forget that a carriage return in rst has no impact on generated doc.
> 
> -- 
> Thomas

Hi Thomas,
I agree that we shouldn't be strict, but the variance in line length was really
huge, and shorter lines are always easier to read. Even my patch just limited
line length to somethign between 80-90 depending on wording, since a hard-80 I
feel is too extreme.

/Bruce
Iremonger, Bernard Dec. 4, 2014, 11:41 a.m. UTC | #4
Hi Bruce, Thomas,

> Subject: Re: [dpdk-dev] [PATCH 2/3] docs: adjust line lengths in FreeBSD GSG rst files
> 
> On Wed, Dec 03, 2014 at 02:23:44PM +0100, Thomas Monjalon wrote:
> > 2014-11-24 15:48, Bruce Richardson:
> > > The FreeBSD GSG rst files had very inconsistent line lengths for
> > > text within paragraph blocks. Sometimes a line would be very short,
> > > while often lines would be quite long.
> > > This patch adjusts the formatting of the rst files so that lines
> > > break at approx the 80-character mark, as is standard in the DPDK source code.
> >
> > I'm not sure we should be strict with line lengths in the doc.
> > The most important thing is to limit the wrapping impact of future patches.
> > Starting a new sentence at the beginning of the line is often a good
> > way to keep context lines unchanged when updating only one sentence.
> > Don't forget that a carriage return in rst has no impact on generated doc.
> >
> > --
> > Thomas
> 
> Hi Thomas,
> I agree that we shouldn't be strict, but the variance in line length was really huge, and shorter lines are
> always easier to read. Even my patch just limited line length to somethign between 80-90 depending
> on wording, since a hard-80 I feel is too extreme.
> 
> /Bruce

When converting the documents originally I chose to wrap sentences that were longer than 120-130 characters.
I normally wrapped at a punctuation point for readability. So a long sentence might wrap over several lines.
Sentences shorter than 130 characters were given a separate line.
I don't think there is anything to be gained by reworking the line lengths as it has no effect on the generated  HTML.

Bernard.
diff mbox

Patch

diff --git a/doc/guides/freebsd_gsg/build_dpdk.rst b/doc/guides/freebsd_gsg/build_dpdk.rst
index 9b78840..8f72a5e 100644
--- a/doc/guides/freebsd_gsg/build_dpdk.rst
+++ b/doc/guides/freebsd_gsg/build_dpdk.rst
@@ -70,7 +70,8 @@  Where:
 
 *   TOOLCHAIN is: gcc
 
-The configuration files for the Intel® DPDK targets can be found in the DPDK/config directory in the form of:
+The configuration files for the Intel® DPDK targets can be found in the DPDK/config
+directory in the form of:
 
 ::
 
@@ -79,10 +80,10 @@  The configuration files for the Intel® DPDK targets can be found in the DPDK/co
 .. note::
 
     Configuration files are provided with the RTE_MACHINE optimization level set.
-    Within the configuration files, the RTE_MACHINE configuration value is set to native,
-    which means that the compiled software is tuned for the platform on which it is built.
-    For more information on this setting, and its possible values,
-    see the *Intel® DPDK Programmers Guide*.
+    Within the configuration files, the RTE_MACHINE configuration value is set
+    to native, which means that the compiled software is tuned for the platform
+    on which it is built.  For more information on this setting, and its
+    possible values, see the *Intel® DPDK Programmers Guide*.
 
 To install and make the target, use gmake install T=<target> CC=gcc48.
 
@@ -92,9 +93,8 @@  For example to compile for FreeBSD* use:
 
     gmake install T=x86_64-native-bsdapp-gcc CC=gcc48
 
-To prepare a target without building it, for example,
-if the configuration changes need to be made before compilation,
-use the gmake config T=<target> command:
+To prepare a target without building it, for example, if the configuration
+changes need to be made before compilation, use the gmake config T=<target> command:
 
 .. code-block:: console
 
@@ -106,13 +106,14 @@  To build after configuration, change directory to ./x86_64-native-bsdapp-gcc and
 
     gmake CC=gcc48
 
-Browsing the Installed Intel®DPDK Environment Target
-----------------------------------------------------
+Browsing the Installed Intel® DPDK Environment Target
+-----------------------------------------------------
 
-Once a target is created, it contains all the libraries
-and header files for the Intel® DPDK environment that are required to build customer applications.
-In addition, the test and testpmd applications are built under the build/app directory, which may be used for testing.
-A kmod directory is also present that contains the kernel modules to install:
+Once a target is created, it contains all the libraries and header files for the
+Intel® DPDK environment that are required to build customer applications.
+In addition, the test and testpmd applications are built under the build/app
+directory, which may be used for testing.  A kmod directory is also present that
+contains the kernel modules to install:
 
 .. code-block:: console
 
@@ -122,17 +123,19 @@  A kmod directory is also present that contains the kernel modules to install:
 Loading the Intel® DPDK contigmem Module
 ----------------------------------------
 
-To run any Intel® DPDK application, the contigmem module must be loaded into the running kernel.
-The module is found in the kmod sub-directory of the Intel® DPDK target directory.
-The module can be loaded using kldload (assuming that the current directory is the Intel® DPDK target directory):
+To run any Intel® DPDK application, the contigmem module must be loaded into the
+running kernel. The module is found in the kmod sub-directory of the Intel® DPDK
+target directory. The module can be loaded using kldload (assuming that the
+current directory is the Intel® DPDK target directory):
 
 .. code-block:: console
 
     kldload ./kmod/contigmem.ko
 
-It is advisable to include the loading of the contigmem module during the boot process to avoid issues
-with potential memory fragmentation during later system up time.
-This can be achieved by copying the module to the /boot/kernel/ directory and placing the following into /boot/loader.conf:
+It is advisable to include the loading of the contigmem module during the boot
+process to avoid issues with potential memory fragmentation during later system
+up time.  This can be achieved by copying the module to the /boot/kernel/
+directory and placing the following into /boot/loader.conf:
 
 ::
 
@@ -140,11 +143,13 @@  This can be achieved by copying the module to the /boot/kernel/ directory and pl
 
 .. note::
 
-    The contigmem_load directive should be placed after any definitions of hw.contigmem.num_buffers
-    and hw.contigmem.buffer_size if the default values are not to be used.
+    The contigmem_load directive should be placed after any definitions of
+    hw.contigmem.num_buffers and hw.contigmem.buffer_size if the default values
+    are not to be used.
 
-An error such as kldload: can't load ./x86_64-native-bsdapp-gcc/kmod/contigmem.ko: Exec format error,
-is generally attributed to not having enough contiguous memory available and can be verified via dmesg or /var/log/messages:
+An error such as kldload: can't load ./x86_64-native-bsdapp-gcc/kmod/contigmem.ko:
+Exec format error, is generally attributed to not having enough contiguous memory
+available and can be verified via dmesg or /var/log/messages:
 
 .. code-block:: console
 
@@ -155,8 +160,10 @@  To avoid this error, reduce the number of buffers or the buffer size.
 Loading the Intel® DPDK nic_uio Module
 --------------------------------------
 
-After loading the contigmem module, the nic_uio must also be loaded into the running kernel prior to running any Intel® DPDK application.
-This module must be loaded using the kldload command as shown below (assuming that the current directory is the Intel® DPDK target directory).
+After loading the contigmem module, the nic_uio must also be loaded into the
+running kernel prior to running any Intel® DPDK application.  This module must
+be loaded using the kldload command as shown below (assuming that the current
+directory is the Intel® DPDK target directory).
 
 .. code-block:: console
 
@@ -164,12 +171,13 @@  This module must be loaded using the kldload command as shown below (assuming th
 
 .. note::
 
-    Currently loaded modules can be seen by using the kldstat command.
-    A module can be removed from the running kernel by using kldunload <module_name>.
-    While the nic_uio module can be loaded during boot,
-    the module load order cannot be guaranteed and in the case where only some ports are bound to nic_uio
-    and others remain in use by the original driver, it is necessary to load nic_uio after booting into the kernel,
-    specifically after the original driver has been loaded.
+    Currently loaded modules can be seen by using the kldstat command.  A module
+    can be removed from the running kernel by using kldunload <module_name>.
+    While the nic_uio module can be loaded during boot, the module load order
+    cannot be guaranteed and in the case where only some ports are bound to
+    nic_uio and others remain in use by the original driver, it is necessary to
+    load nic_uio after booting into the kernel, specifically after the original
+    driver has been loaded.
 
 To load the module during boot, copy the nic_uio module to /boot/kernel and place the following into /boot/loader.conf:
 
@@ -184,8 +192,8 @@  To load the module during boot, copy the nic_uio module to /boot/kernel and plac
 Binding Network Ports to the nic_uio Module
 -------------------------------------------
 
-By default, the nic_uio module will take ownership of network ports if they are recognized Intel® DPDK devices
-and are not owned by another module.
+By default, the nic_uio module will take ownership of network ports if they are
+recognized Intel® DPDK devices and are not owned by another module.
 
 Device ownership can be viewed using the pciconf -l command.
 
@@ -209,45 +217,53 @@  The first column constitutes three components:
 
 Where no driver is associated with a device, the device name will be none.
 
-By default, the FreeBSD* kernel will include built-in drivers for the most common devices;
-a kernel rebuild would normally be required to either remove the drivers or configure them as loadable modules.
+By default, the FreeBSD* kernel will include built-in drivers for the most common
+devices; a kernel rebuild would normally be required to either remove the drivers
+or configure them as loadable modules.
 
-To avoid building a custom kernel, the nic_uio module can detach a network port from its current device driver.
-This is achieved by setting the hw.nic_uio.bdfs kernel environment variable prior to loading nic_uio, as follows:
+To avoid building a custom kernel, the nic_uio module can detach a network port
+from its current device driver.  This is achieved by setting the hw.nic_uio.bdfs
+kernel environment variable prior to loading nic_uio, as follows:
 
 ::
 
     hw.nic_uio.bdfs="b:d:f,b:d:f,..."
 
-Where a comma separated list of selectors is set, the list must not contain any whitespace.
+Where a comma separated list of selectors is set, the list must not contain any
+whitespace.
 
-For example to re-bind ix2@pci0:2:0:0 and ix3@pci0:2:0: to the nic_uio module upon loading, use the following command:
+For example to re-bind ix2@pci0:2:0:0 and ix3@pci0:2:0: to the nic_uio module
+upon loading, use the following command:
 
 .. code-block:: console
 
     kenv hw.nic_uio.bdfs="2:0:0,2:0:1"
 
-The variable can also be specified during boot by placing the following into /boot/ loader.conf:
+The variable can also be specified during boot by placing the following into
+/boot/loader.conf:
 
 ::
 
     hw.nic_uio.bdfs="2:0:0,2:0:1"
 
-To restore the original device binding,
-it is necessary to reboot FreeBSD* if the original driver has been compiled into the kernel.
+To restore the original device binding, it is necessary to reboot FreeBSD* if the
+original driver has been compiled into the kernel.
 
 For example to rebind some or all ports to the original driver:
 
-Update or remove the hw.nic_uio.bdfs entry in /boot/loader.conf if specified there for persistency, then;
+Update or remove the hw.nic_uio.bdfs entry in /boot/loader.conf if specified there
+for persistency, then;
 
 .. code-block:: console
 
     reboot
 
-If rebinding to a driver that is a loadable module, the network port binding can be reset without rebooting.
-This requires the unloading of the nic_uio module and the original driver.
+If rebinding to a driver that is a loadable module, the network port binding can
+be reset without rebooting.  This requires the unloading of the nic_uio module
+and the original driver.
 
-Update or remove the hw.nic_uio.bdfs entry from /boot/loader.conf if specified there for persistency.
+Update or remove the hw.nic_uio.bdfs entry from /boot/loader.conf if specified
+there for persistency.
 
 .. code-block:: console
 
diff --git a/doc/guides/freebsd_gsg/build_sample_apps.rst b/doc/guides/freebsd_gsg/build_sample_apps.rst
index 7e85467..3b2d0c1 100644
--- a/doc/guides/freebsd_gsg/build_sample_apps.rst
+++ b/doc/guides/freebsd_gsg/build_sample_apps.rst
@@ -31,14 +31,15 @@ 
 Compiling and Running Sample Applications
 =========================================
 
-The chapter describes how to compile and run applications in an Intel® DPDK environment.
-It also provides a pointer to where sample applications are stored.
+The chapter describes how to compile and run applications in an Intel® DPDK
+environment. It also provides a pointer to where sample applications are stored.
 
 Compiling a Sample Application
 ------------------------------
 
-Once an Intel® DPDK target environment directory has been created (such as x86_64-native-bsdapp-gcc),
-it contains all libraries and header files required to build an application.
+Once an Intel® DPDK target environment directory has been created (such as
+x86_64-native-bsdapp-gcc), it contains all libraries and header files required
+to build an application.
 
 When compiling an application in the FreeBSD* environment on the Intel® DPDK,
 the following variables must be exported:
@@ -48,15 +49,15 @@  the following variables must be exported:
 *   RTE_TARGET - Points to the Intel® DPDK target environment directory.
     For FreeBSD*, this is the x86_64-native-bsdapp-gcc directory.
 
-The following is an example of creating the helloworld application,
-which runs in the Intel® DPDK FreeBSD* environment.
-This example may be found in the ${RTE_SDK}/examples directory.
+The following is an example of creating the helloworld application, which runs
+in the Intel® DPDK FreeBSD* environment. This example may be found in the
+${RTE_SDK}/examples directory.
 
-The directory contains the main.c file.
-This file, when combined with the libraries in the Intel® DPDK target environment,
-calls the various functions to initialize the Intel® DPDK environment,
-then launches an entry point (dispatch application) for each core to be utilized.
-By default, the binary is generated in the build directory.
+The directory contains the main.c file.  This file, when combined with the
+libraries in the Intel® DPDK target environment, calls the various functions to
+initialize the Intel® DPDK environment, then launches an entry point (dispatch
+application) for each core to be utilized.  By default, the binary is generated
+in the build directory.
 
 .. code-block:: console
 
@@ -73,9 +74,11 @@  By default, the binary is generated in the build directory.
 
 .. note::
 
-    In the above example, helloworld was in the directory structure of the Intel® DPDK.
-    However, it could have been located outside the directory structure to keep the Intel® DPDK structure intact.
-    In the following case, the helloworld application is copied to a new directory as a new starting point.
+    In the above example, helloworld was in the directory structure of the
+    Intel® DPDK.  However, it could have been located outside the directory
+    structure to keep the Intel® DPDK structure intact.  In the following case,
+    the helloworld application is copied to a new directory as a new starting
+    point.
 
 .. code-block:: console
 
@@ -96,8 +99,9 @@  Running a Sample Application
 
 #.  Any ports to be used by the application must be already bound to the nic_uio module,
     as described in section Section 3.6, “ , ” prior to running the application.
-    The application is linked with the Intel® DPDK target environment's Environment Abstraction Layer (EAL) library,
-    which provides some options that are generic to every Intel® DPDK application.
+    The application is linked with the Intel® DPDK target environment's Environment
+    Abstraction Layer (EAL) library, which provides some options that are generic
+    to every Intel® DPDK application.
 
 The following is the list of options that can be given to the EAL:
 
@@ -107,25 +111,27 @@  The following is the list of options that can be given to the EAL:
 
 .. note::
 
-    EAL has a common interface between all operating systems and is based on the Linux* notation for PCI devices.
-    The device and function separator used is a ":" rather than "." as seen with pciconf on FreeBSD*.
-    For example, a FreeBSD* device selector of pci0:2:0:1 is referred to as 02:00.1 in EAL.
+    EAL has a common interface between all operating systems and is based on the
+    Linux* notation for PCI devices.  The device and function separator used is
+    a ":" rather than "." as seen with pciconf on FreeBSD*.  For example, a
+    FreeBSD* device selector of pci0:2:0:1 is referred to as 02:00.1 in EAL.
 
 The EAL options for FreeBSD* are as follows:
 
 *   -c COREMASK
-    : A hexadecimal bit mask of the cores to run on.
-    Note that core numbering can change between platforms and should be determined beforehand.
+    : A hexadecimal bit mask of the cores to run on.  Note that core numbering
+    can change between platforms and should be determined beforehand.
 
 *   -n NUM
     : Number of memory channels per processor socket.
 
 *   -b <domain:bus:devid.func>
-    : blacklisting of ports; prevent EAL from using specified PCI device (multiple -b options are allowed).
+    : blacklisting of ports; prevent EAL from using specified PCI device
+    (multiple -b options are allowed).
 
 *   --use-device
-    : use the specified ethernet device(s) only.
-    Use comma-separate <[domain:]bus:devid.func> values. Cannot be used with -b option.
+    : use the specified ethernet device(s) only.  Use comma-separate
+    <[domain:]bus:devid.func> values. Cannot be used with -b option.
 
 *   -r NUM
     : Number of memory ranks.
@@ -153,9 +159,9 @@  Other options, specific to Linux* and are not supported under FreeBSD* are as fo
 
 The -c and the -n options are mandatory; the others are optional.
 
-Copy the Intel® DPDK application binary to your target,
-then run the application as follows (assuming the platform has four memory channels,
-and that cores 0-3 are present and are to be used for running the application):
+Copy the Intel® DPDK application binary to your target, then run the application
+as follows (assuming the platform has four memory channels, and that cores 0-3
+are present and are to be used for running the application):
 
 .. code-block:: console
 
@@ -163,18 +169,20 @@  and that cores 0-3 are present and are to be used for running the application):
 
 .. note::
 
-    The --proc-type and --file-prefix EAL options are used for running multiple Intel® DPDK processes.
-    See the “Multi-process Sample Application” chapter in the
-    *Intel® DPDK Sample Applications User Guide and the Intel® DPDK Programmers Guide* for more details.
+    The --proc-type and --file-prefix EAL options are used for running multiple
+    Intel® DPDK processes.  See the “Multi-process Sample Application” chapter
+    in the *Intel® DPDK Sample Applications User Guide and the Intel® DPDK
+    Programmers Guide* for more details.
 
 Running Intel®DPDK Applications Without Root Privileges
 -------------------------------------------------------
 
-Although applications using the Intel® DPDK use network ports and other hardware resources directly,
-with a number of small permission adjustments,
-it is possible to run these applications as a user other than “root”.
-To do so, the ownership, or permissions, on the following file system objects should be adjusted to ensure
-that the user account being used to run the Intel® DPDK application has access to them:
+Although applications using the Intel® DPDK use network ports and other hardware
+resources directly, with a number of small permission adjustments, it is possible
+to run these applications as a user other than “root”.  To do so, the ownership,
+or permissions, on the following file system objects should be adjusted to ensure
+that the user account being used to run the Intel® DPDK application has access
+to them:
 
 *   The userspace-io device files in /dev, for example, /dev/uio0, /dev/uio1, and so on
 
diff --git a/doc/guides/freebsd_gsg/intro.rst b/doc/guides/freebsd_gsg/intro.rst
index bb19615..fc27ed0 100644
--- a/doc/guides/freebsd_gsg/intro.rst
+++ b/doc/guides/freebsd_gsg/intro.rst
@@ -31,12 +31,14 @@ 
 Introduction
 ============
 
-This document contains instructions for installing and configuring the Intel® Data Plane Development Kit(Intel® DPDK) software.
-It is designed to get customers up and running quickly.
-The document describes how to compile and run an Intel® DPDK application in a FreeBSD* application (bsdapp) environment,
-without going deeply into detail.
+This document contains instructions for installing and configuring the Intel®
+Data Plane Development Kit(Intel® DPDK) software.  It is designed to get customers
+up and running quickly.  The document describes how to compile and run an Intel®
+DPDK application in a FreeBSD* application (bsdapp) environment, without going
+deeply into detail.
 
-For a comprehensive guide to installing and using FreeBSD*, the following handbook is available from the FreeBSD* Documentation Project:
+For a comprehensive guide to installing and using FreeBSD*, the following
+handbook is available from the FreeBSD* Documentation Project:
 
 `http://www.freebsd.org/doc/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/index.html <http://www.freebsd.org/doc/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/index.html>`_
 
@@ -45,30 +47,36 @@  DocumentationRoadmap
 
 The following is a list of Intel® DPDK documents in the suggested reading order:
 
-*   **Release Notes** : Provides release-specific information, including supported features, limitations, fixed issues, known issues and so on.
-    Also, provides the answers to frequently asked questions in FAQ format.
+*   **Release Notes** : Provides release-specific information, including supported
+    features, limitations, fixed issues, known issues and so on.  Also, provides the
+    answers to frequently asked questions in FAQ format.
 
-*   **Getting Started Guide** (this document): Describes how to install and configure the Intel® DPDK;
-    designed to get users up and running quickly with the software.
+*   **Getting Started Guide** (this document): Describes how to install and
+    configure the Intel® DPDK; designed to get users up and running quickly with the
+    software.
 
 *   **Programmer's Guide**: Describes:
 
-    *   The software architecture and how to use it (through examples), specifically in a Linux* application (linuxapp) environment
+    *   The software architecture and how to use it (through examples),
+        specifically in a Linux* application (linuxapp) environment
 
-    *   The content of the Intel® DPDK, the build system
-        (including the commands that can be used in the root Intel® DPDK Makefile to build the development kit and an application)
-        and guidelines for porting an application
+    *   The content of the Intel® DPDK, the build system (including the commands
+        that can be used in the root Intel® DPDK Makefile to build the development
+        kit and an application) and guidelines for porting an application
 
-    *   Optimizations used in the software and those that should be considered for new development
+    *   Optimizations used in the software and those that should be considered
+        for new development
 
     A glossary of terms is also provided.
 
-*   **API Reference**: Provides detailed information about Intel® DPDK functions, data structures and other programming constructs.
+*   **API Reference**: Provides detailed information about Intel® DPDK functions,
+    data structures and other programming constructs.
 
 *   **Sample Applications User Guide**: Describes a set of sample applications.
-    Each chapter describes a sample application that showcases specific functionality and provides instructions on how to compile,
-    run and use the sample application.
+    Each chapter describes a sample application that showcases specific functionality
+    and provides instructions on how to compile, run and use the sample application.
 
 .. note::
 
-    These documents are available for download as a separate documentation package at the same location as the Intel® DPDK code package.
+    These documents are available for download as a separate documentation
+    package at the same location as the Intel® DPDK code package.
diff --git a/doc/guides/freebsd_gsg/sys_reqs.rst b/doc/guides/freebsd_gsg/sys_reqs.rst
index 2314f39..8ce0ba4 100644
--- a/doc/guides/freebsd_gsg/sys_reqs.rst
+++ b/doc/guides/freebsd_gsg/sys_reqs.rst
@@ -39,27 +39,28 @@  Compilationofthe Intel® DPDK
 .. note::
 
     The Intel® DPDK and its applications requires the GNU make system (gmake)
-    and the GNU Compiler Collection (gcc) to build on FreeBSD*.
-    The installation of these tools is covered in this section.
+    and the GNU Compiler Collection (gcc) to build on FreeBSD*.  The
+    installation of these tools is covered in this section.
 
 **Required Tools:**
 
 .. note::
 
-    Testing has been performed using FreeBSD* 9.2-RELEASE (x86_64),
-    FreeBSD* 10.0-RELEASE (x86_64) and requires the installation of the kernel sources,
-    which should be included during the installation of FreeBSD*.
-    The Intel® DPDK also requires the use of FreeBSD* ports to compile and function.
+    Testing has been performed using FreeBSD* 9.2-RELEASE (x86_64), FreeBSD*
+    10.0-RELEASE (x86_64) and requires the installation of the kernel sources,
+    which should be included during the installation of FreeBSD*.  The Intel®
+    DPDK also requires the use of FreeBSD* ports to compile and function.
 
-To use the FreeBSD* ports system,
-it is required to update and extract the FreeBSD* ports tree by issuing the following commands:
+To use the FreeBSD* ports system, it is required to update and extract the FreeBSD*
+ports tree by issuing the following commands:
 
 .. code-block:: console
 
     root@host:~ # portsnap fetch
     root@host:~ # portsnap extract
 
-If the environment requires proxies for external communication, these can be set using:
+If the environment requires proxies for external communication, these can be set
+using:
 
 .. code-block:: console
 
@@ -107,8 +108,8 @@  The ports required and their locations are as follows:
 
 *   /usr/src/contrib/libexecinfo
 
-When running the make config-recursive command, a dialog may be presented to the user.
-For the installation of the Intel® DPDK, the default options were used.
+When running the make config-recursive command, a dialog may be presented to the
+user. For the installation of the Intel® DPDK, the default options were used.
 
 .. note::
 
@@ -120,24 +121,24 @@  Running Intel® DPDK Applications
 --------------------------------
 
 To run an Intel® DPDK application, physically contiguous memory is required.
-In the absence of non-transparent superpages,
-the included sources for the contigmem kernel module provides the ability to
-present contiguous blocks of memory for the Intel® DPDK to use.
-Section 3.4, “Loading the Intel® DPDK contigmem Module” on page 8
-for details on the loading of this module.
+In the absence of non-transparent superpages, the included sources for the
+contigmem kernel module provides the ability to present contiguous blocks of
+memory for the Intel® DPDK to use.  Section 3.4, “Loading the Intel® DPDK
+Contigmem Module” on page 8 for details on the loading of this module.
 
-Using Intel® DPDK contigmem Module
+Using Intel® DPDK Contigmem Module
 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 
-The amount of physically contiguous memory along with the number of physically contiguous blocks
-can be set at runtime and prior to module loading using:
+The amount of physically contiguous memory along with the number of physically
+contiguous blocks can be set at runtime and prior to module loading using:
 
 .. code-block:: console
 
     root@host:~ # kenv hw.contigmem.num_buffers=n
     root@host:~ # kenv hw.contigmem.buffer_size=m
 
-The kernel environment variables can also be specified during boot by placing the following in /boot/loader.conf:
+The kernel environment variables can also be specified during boot by placing the
+following in /boot/loader.conf:
 
 ::
 
@@ -149,9 +150,9 @@  The variables can be inspected using the following command:
 
     root@host:~ # sysctl -a hw.contigmem
 
-Where n is the number of blocks and m is the size in bytes of each area of contiguous memory.
-A default of two buffers of size 1073741824 bytes (1 Gigabyte) each is set during module load
-if they are not specified in the environment.
+Where n is the number of blocks and m is the size in bytes of each area of
+contiguous memory.  A default of two buffers of size 1073741824 bytes (1 Gigabyte)
+each is set during module load if they are not specified in the environment.
 
 .. note::